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Garage Door Installation Marlboro NJ

garage door in Marlboro NJ is a large door on a garage that opens either manually or by an electric motor (a garage door opener). Garage doors are frequently large enough to accommodate automobiles and other vehicles. Small garage doors may be made in a single panel that tilts up and back across the garage ceiling. Larger doors are usually made in several jointed panels that roll up on tracks across the garage ceiling, or into a roll above the doorway. The operating mechanism is spring-loaded or counterbalanced to offset the weight of the door and reduce human or motor effort required to operate the door. Less commonly, some garage doors slide or swing horizontally. Doors are made of wood, metal, or fiberglass, and may be insulated to prevent heat loss.

An older typical version of an overhead garage door in Marlboro NJ would be build with one-piece panel, although the newer versions of overhead garage doors this days build from several panels hinged together that roll along a system of tracks guided by rollers. The weight of the door is balanced by either a torsion spring system or a pair of extension springs.

Single panel doors are constructed from one monolithic panel. From the closed position a single panel door swings up and overhead with a hinge on each side (known as jamb type hardware) to the fully open position. A disadvantage of monolithic panel doors is that the swing up arc of the door occurs partially outside the garage. This means a vehicle must stop and park several feet in front of the door to avoid being hit by the garage door when it is opened. Single panel doors can also be installed with (one piece track type hardware) that folds the door back with a single horizontal track on each side (which is mounted at the top of the wood frame ) and a roller, (mounted to the top of the door on each side. A hinge on each side that attaches to the bottom of each side of garage door. Using track hardware, a car can be parked much closer to the door, as the whole door, when in the open position, rests completely inside of the garage door header. (Track type hardware has much less arc when raising and lowering the garage door as opposed jamb type hardware.)

Marlboro NJ sectional doors are usually constructed of three to eight panels and slide up and overhead. Sectional doors occupy exactly the same amount of internal garage space as a monolithic door. Sectional doors have two advantages over single panel monolithic doors:

  • Sectional doors do not require any space outside the garage to open. A vehicle may park very close to the garage before opening the door.
  • Each panel of a sectional door has its own connection to the door track. This increases reliability and robustness compared to monolithic doors, which have only a few track connections for the whole panel.

Garage doors can be made out of many materials, but steel, aluminum, wood, copper, glass and vinyl (polyethylene) are the most popular materials. Some Marlboro NJ manufacturers incorporate foamed-in-place polyurethane insulation within the monolithic panel and sectional garage doors.

The side sliding sectional door 

  • A lot of space under the garage ceiling.
  • You can use the entire ceiling of the garage.
  • Fast access to the garage

Garage Door Opener Installation Marlboro NJ

A Marlboro NJ garage door opener is a motorized device that opens and closes garage doors. Most are controlled by switches on the garage wall, as well as by remote controls carried by the owner.

The first wireless garage door openers were invented and developed by two US inventors at the same time, one in Illinois and the other in Washington state. They were unknown to each other.

The first Marlboro NJ garage door opener remote controls were simple and consisted of a very simple transmitter (the remote) and receiver which controlled the opener mechanism. The transmitter would transmit on a designated frequency; the receiver would listen for the radio signal, then open or close the garage, depending on the door position. The basic concept of this can be traced back to World War II. This type of system was used to detonate remote bombs. While novel at the time, the technology ran its course when garage door openers became widely available and used. Then, not only did a person open their garage door, they opened their neighbor’s garage door as well. While the garage door remote is low in power and in range, it was powerful enough to interfere with other receivers in the area.

The second stage of the wireless garage door opener system dealt with the shared frequency problem. To rectify this, multicode systems were developed. These systems required a garage door owner to preset a digital code by switching eight to twelve DIP switches on the receiver and transmitter. While these switches provided garage door systems with 28 = 256 to 212 = 4,096 different codes, they were not designed with high security in mind; the main intent was to avoid interference with similar systems nearby. Criminals were able to defeat the basic security of this system by trying different codes on a regular transmitter. They could also make code grabbers to record and re-transmit a signal, or code scanners, that would attempt every possible combination in a short time. Multicode openers became unpopular in areas where security was an issue, but due to their ease of programming, such openers are often used to operate such things as the gates in gated Marlboro NJ apartment complexes.

An intermediate stage of the garage door opener market between the second and third stages eliminated the DIP switches and used remotes preprogrammed to one out of roughly 3.5 billion unique codes. This system was backward compatible with the DIP switch remote codes, and each remote code (either with DIP switches or with a unique preprogrammed code) can be added into the receiver's memory by pressing the learn button on the opener, and can be deleted from the receiver's memory by holding it. While the code transmitted by the remote was still fixed, it was not changeable by the user (except if using legacy DIP switch remotes) and thus was much more difficult to duplicate unless two remotes shared the same code (which was very unlikely since the odds of two remotes sharing the same code was 1 out of roughly 3.5 billion except if legacy DIP switch remotes were used). This approach was an improvement over the fixed DIP switch codes, but was soon rendered obsolete when rolling code (which generates a new code on each press) devices became available in Marlboro NJ.

The third stage of the Marlboro NJ garage door opener market uses a frequency spectrum range between 100-400 MHz and most of the transmitter/receivers rely on hopping or rolling code technology. This approach prevents criminals from recording a code and replaying it to open a garage door. Since the signal is supposed to be significantly different from that of any other garage door remote control, manufacturers claim it is impossible for someone other than the owner of the remote to open the garage. When the transmitter sends a code, it generates a new code using an encoder. The receiver, after receiving a correct code, uses the same encoder with the same original seed to generate a new code that it will accept in the future. Because there is a high probability that someone might accidentally push the open button while not in range and desynchronize the code, the receiver generates look-a-head codes ahead of time. Rolling code is the same method of security used on the clickers of cars, and with some internet protocols for secure sites.

The fourth stage of the Marlboro NJ garage door opener systems is similar to third stage, but it is limited to the 315 MHz frequency. The 315 MHz frequency range avoids interference from the Land Mobile Radio System (LMRS) used by the U.S. military.

The following standards are used by units manufactured by Chamberlain (including LiftMaster and Craftsman):

Chain Driven Garage Door Installation Marlboro NJ

Chain-drive systems are the most common and least expensive type in Marlboro NJ. An electric motor drives a metal chain that raises and lowers the door. While reliable, these systems can be noisy.

Garage doors cause injury and property damage (including expensive damage to the door itself) in several different ways. The most common causes of injury from garage door systems include falling doors, pinch points, improperly adjusted opener force settings and safety eyes, attempts at do-it-yourself repair without the proper knowledge or tools, and uncontrolled release of spring tension (on extension spring systems).

A garage door with a broken spring, or the wrong strength spring, can fall. Because the effective mass of the door increases as the garage door sections transfer from the horizontal to vertical door tracks, a falling garage door accelerates rapidly. A free falling garage door can cause serious injury or death.

The sections and rollers on garage doors represent a major pinch hazard. Children should never be allowed near a moving garage door for this reason. On manually operated garage doors, handles should be installed vertically, to promote “vertical orientation of the hand”.

Mechanical garage door openers can pull or push a garage door with enough force to injure or kill people and pets if they become trapped. All modern openers are equipped with “force settings” that make the door reverse if it encounters too much resistance while closing or opening. Any garage door opener sold in the United States after 1992 requires safety eyes—sensors that prevent the door from closing if obstructed. Force settings should cause a door to stop or reverse on encountering more than approximately 20 lbs (9.07 kg) of resistance. Safety eyes should be installed a maximum of six inches above the ground. Many garage door injuries, and nearly all garage door related property damage, can be avoided by following these precautions.

Certain parts, especially springs, cables, bottom brackets, and spring anchor plates, are under extreme tension. Injuries can occur if parts under tension are removed.

Extension spring systems should always be restrained by a safety cable that runs through the middle of the spring, tying off to a solid point at the rear and front of the horizontal door track. Extension springs represent a hazard to bystanders when a spring, pulley, or cable breaks under tension. Metal parts from extension spring systems can suddenly be launched.

A common Marlboro NJ material for a new garage door is steel sheet formed to look like a raised panel wooden door. Steel doors are available in uninsulated, insulated, and double skin steel. A design mimicking carriage house doors has become popular since about 2002, and many manufacturers clad the exterior of a steel door with composite, vinyl boards, or DecamTrim to give it the appearance of wood. A more economical alternative for garage doors is steel stamped construction.

Belt Driven Garage Door Installation Marlboro NJ

Belt-drive systems use a rubber belt instead of a chain to lift the door. These systems typically offer the smoothest and quietest operation in Marlboro NJ.

torsion spring counterbalance system consists of one or two tightly wound up springs on a steel shaft with cable drums at both ends. The entire Marlboro NJ apparatus mounts on the header wall above the garage door and has three supports: a center bearing plate with a steel or nylon bearing and two end bearing plates at both ends. The springs themselves consist of the steel wire with a stationary cone at one end and a winding cone at the other end. The stationary cone is attached to the center bearing plate. The winding cone consists of holes every 90 degrees for winding the springs and two set screws to secure the springs to the shaft. Steel counterbalance cables run from the roller brackets at the bottom corners of the door to a notch in the cable drums. When the door is raised, the springs unwind and the stored tension lifts the door by turning the shaft, thus turning the cable drums, wrapping the cables around the grooves on the cable drums. When the door is lowered, the cables unwrap from the drums and the springs are rewound to full tension.

Life of torsion spring in Marlboro NJ

Garage door manufacturers typically produce garage doors fitted with torsion springs that provide a minimum of 10,000 to 15,000 cycles and are guaranteed for three to seven years. One cycle is a single opening and closing sequence. Most manufacturers offer a 30,000 cycle spring. However, it is important to remember that if the weight of the garage door is increased by adding glass, additional insulation, or even several coats of paint, the life of the torsion spring may be greatly reduced.

Other factors like poor garage door maintenance, loose tracks, or components shorten torsion spring life. Owners are advised to avoid applying grease to garage door tracks because that makes the wheels "skate" in the track instead of turning on their bearings. Only bearings, hinges, and spring wire require lubricant.

An extension spring counterbalance system in Marlboro NJ consists of a pair of stretched springs running parallel to the horizontal tracks. The springs lift the door through a system of pulleys and counterbalance cables running from the bottom corner brackets through the pulleys. When the door is raised, the springs contract, thus lifting the door as the tension is released.

Crown Molding Installation Marlboro NJ

Crown molding encapsulates a large family of moldings which are designed to gracefully flare out to a finished top edge. Crown molding in Marlboro NJ is generally used for capping walls, pilasters, and cabinets, and is used extensively in the creation of interior and exterior cornice assemblies and door and window hoods.

In recent times, Marlboro NJ crown moldings have generally made their appearance as mostly decorated plaster or wooden trim where walls meet ceilings.

Crown molding is typically applied along the seams where ceiling meets wall. Usually it is not placed flush against the wall nor against the ceiling. Instead, when viewed from the molding's end (or as a cross-section), it, the ceiling, and the wall form a "hollow" triangle. This adds a difficulty to the installation process, namely the need for complex cuts to form corners where two walls meet.

There are two common ways to fashion inside corners. One is to use a compound miter saw to cut the ends of the corner pieces along two axes simultaneously. The other, called coping, is a two step process, first to cut a simple miter and then to use a coping saw to undercut the miters.

Many different companies now manufacture crown molding in materials such as plastic and foam. These typically are offered with corner blocks, and are popular with DIY home improvement enthusiasts.

Using a coped joint for interior corners saves you the trouble of having to determine and cut the exact inside degree measurement since most corners are not exactly 90/45 degrees. Outside corners must be mitered, but use care because not all outside corners measure true. Measure and cut accordingly. If the angle is not exactly 45/22.5 degrees use a corner measuring device or piece of scrap crown molding to obtain the right measurement before you make your final cut.

Fitting crown molding requires a cut at the correct combination of miter angle and bevel angle. The calculation of these angles is affected by two variables: (1) the spring angle (or crown angle, typically sold in 45 degree and 38 degree formats), and (2) the wall angle.

Chair Rail Installation Marlboro NJ

How high should we install chair rail in Marlboro NJ? Ask most carpenters and they’ll either say 36 in., 32 in. or they’ll measure the back of a chair and tell you to lay it out so the chair won’t scar the wall. Well, I’m sorry to say, that unless your ceilings are 16-ft. tall, 36 in. is way too high for the chair rail; and letting the back of the chair set the chair rail height is like letting the size of a rug decide the size of a room. In most cases, it just doesn’t work!

Chairs and chair rail may sound like they have a lot in common, but the relationship is limited to their approximate heights. Chair rail is the most misused and abused molding in new Marlboro NJ houses today. But it is also the easiest molding to install correctly, and one that can do the most to make a house feel like a home.

The classical rules of architecture are the key to the proper size and placement of moldings in a room. Benjamin uses a slightly different set of proportional rules than Pain. But the overall effect remains the same. In the classically proportioned room, not only do we relate to the space, but the parts and pieces also “speak to” and relate to one another, from the crown to the base to the casing to the chair rail—and ultimately to us. Especially if weren’t not short with big feet.

When it comes to chair rail, I always advise Marlboro NJ customers to err on the side of too low rather than too high. Installing the chair rail or wainscot too high (see photo, right) diminishes the size of a room, making it feel uncomfortably squat and stuffed, kind of how you feel after eating Thanksgiving dinner.

Height isn’t the only problem we encounter when we install chair rail. Probably the biggest problem isn’t where to start it, but how to stop it—how to terminate, or resolve, the chair rail into casing, stairs, and other moldings.

Coffered Ceiling Installation Marlboro NJ

coffer (or coffering) in architecture, is a sunken panel in the shape of a square, rectangle, or octagon in a ceilingsoffitor vault. A series of these sunken panels were used as decoration for a ceiling or a vault, also called caissons ('boxes"), or lacunaria ("spaces, openings"), so that a coffered ceiling can be called a lacunar ceiling: the strength of the structure is in the framework of the coffers. The stone coffers of the ancient Greeks and Romans are the earliest surviving examples, but a seventh-century BC Etruscan chamber tomb in the necropolis of San Giuliano, which is cut in soft tufa-like stone reproduces a ceiling with beams and cross-beams lying on them, with flat panels filling the lacunae. For centuries, it was thought that wooden coffers were first made by crossing the wooden beams of a ceiling in the Loire Valley châteaux of the early Renaissance. In 2012, however, archaeologists working under Andrew Wallace-Hadrill at the House of the Telephus in Herculaneum discovered that wooden coffered ceilings were constructed in Roman times. Experimentation with the possible shapes in coffering, which solve problems of mathematical tiling, or tessellation, were a feature of Islamic as well as Renaissance architecture. The more complicated problems of diminishing the scale of the individual coffers were presented by the requirements of curved surfaces of vaults and domes.

A prominent example of Roman coffering, employed to lighten the weight of the dome, can be found in the ceiling of the rotunda dome in the Pantheon, Rome.

In ancient Chinese wooden architecture, coffering is known as zaojing (Chinese藻井pinyinzǎojǐng).

Interior Exterior Painting Marlboro NJ

Paint is any liquid, liquefiable, or mastic composition that, after application to a substrate in a thin layer, converts to a solid film in Marlboro NJ. It is most commonly used to protect, color, or provide texture to objects. Paint can be made or purchasedin Marlboro NJ in many colors—and in many different types, such as watercolor, artificial, etc. Paint is typically stored, sold, and applied as a liquid, but dries into a solid.

  • Primer is a preparatory coating put on materials before applying the paint itself. The primed surface ensures better adhesion of the paint, thereby increasing the durability of the paint and providing improved protection for the painted surface. Suitable primers also may block and seal stains, or hide a color that is to be painted over.
  • Emulsion paints are water-based paints in which the paint material is dispersed in a liquid that consists mainly of water. For suitable purposes this has advantages in fast drying, low toxicity, low cost, easier application, and easier cleaning of equipment, among other factors.
  • Flat Finish paint is generally used on ceilings or walls that are in bad shape. This finish is useful for hiding imperfections in walls and it is economical in effectively covering relatively great areas. However this finish is not easily washable and is subject to staining.
  • Matte Finish is generally similar to flat finish, but such paints commonly offer superiority washability and coverage.
  • Eggshell Finish has some sheen, supposedly like that of the shell on an egg. This finish provides great washability, but is not very effective at hiding imperfections on walls and similar surfaces. Eggshell finish is valued for bathrooms because it washable and water repellent, so that it tends not to peel in a wet environment.
  • Pearl (Satin) Finish is very durable in terms of washability and resistance to moisture, even in comparison to eggshell finish. It protects walls from dirt, moisture and stains. Accordingly it is exceptionally valuable for bathrooms, furniture, and kitchens, but it is shinier than eggshell, so it is even more prone to show imperfections.
  • Semi-Gloss Finish typically is used on trim to emphasise detail and elegance, and to show off woodwork, such as on doors and furniture. It provides a shiny surface and provides good protection from moisture and stains on walls. Its gloss does however emphasise imperfections on the walls and similar surfaces. It is popular in schools and factories where washability and durability are the main considerations.
  • Varnish and shellac are in effect paints without pigment; they provide a protective coating without substantially changing the color of the surface, though they can emphasise the colour of the material.
  • Wood stain is a type of paint that is formulated to be very "thin", meaning low in viscosity, so that the pigment soaks into a material such as wood rather than remaining in a film on the surface. Stain is mainly dissolved pigment or dye plus binder material in solvent. It is designed to add color without providing a surface coating.
  • Lacquer is a solvent-based paint or varnish that produces an especially hard, durable finish. Usually it is a rapidly-drying formulation.
  • Enamel paint is formulated to give an especially hard, usually glossy, finish. Some enamel paints contain fine glass powder or metal flake instead of the color pigments in standard oil-based paints. Enamel paint sometimes is mixed with varnish or urethane to improve its shine and hardness.
  • glaze is an additive used with paint to slow drying time and increase translucency, as in faux painting and for some artistic effects.
  • roof coating is a fluid that sets as an elastic membrane that can stretch without harm. It provides UV protection to polyurethane foam and is widely used in roof restoration.
  • Fingerpaints are formulations suitable for application with the fingers; they are popular for use by children in primary school activities.
  • Inks are similar to paints, except that they are typically made using finely ground pigments or dyes, and are not designed to leave a thick film of binder. They are used largely for writing or calligraphy.
  • Anti-graffiti coatings are used to defeat the marking of surfaces by graffiti artists or vandals. There are two categories of anti-graffiti coatings: sacrificial and non-bonding:
  • Sacrificial coatings are clear coatings that allow the removal of graffiti, usually by washing the surface with high-pressure water that removes the graffiti together with the coating (hence the term "sacrificial"). After removal of the graffiti, the sacrificial coating must be re-applied for continued protection. Such sacrificial protective coatings are most commonly used on natural-looking masonry surfaces, such as statuary and marble walls, and on rougher surfaces that are difficult to clean.
  • Non-bonding coatings are clear, high-performance coatings, usually catalyzed polyurethanes, that do not bond strongly to paints used for graffiti. Graffiti on such a surface can be removed with a solvent wash, without damaging either the underlying surface or the protective non-bonding coating. These coatings work best on smooth surfaces, and are especially useful on decorative surfaces such as mosaics or painted murals, which might be expected to suffer harm from high pressure sprays.
  • Anti-climb paint is a non-drying paint that appears normal but is extremely slippery. It is useful on drainpipes and ledges to deter burglars and vandals from climbing them, and is found in many public places. When a person attempts to climb objects coated with the paint, it rubs off onto the climber, as well as making it hard for them to climb.
  • Anti-fouling paint, or bottom paint, prevents barnacles and other marine organisms from adhering to the hulls of ships.
  • Insulative paint or insulating paint, reduces the rate of thermal transfer through a surface it's applied to. One type of formulation is based on the addition of hollow microspheres to any suitable type of paint.
  • Anti-slip paint contains chemicals or grit to increase the friction of a surface so as to decrease the risk of slipping, particularly in wet conditions.
  • Road marking paint is specially used to marking and painting road traffic signs and lines, to form a durable coating film on the road surface. It must be fast drying, provide a thick coating, and resist wear and slipping, especially in wet conditions.

Bathroom Renovations Marlboro NJ

Renovation (also called remodeling in Marlboro NJ ) is the process of improving a broken, damaged, or outdated structure. Renovations are typically either commercial or residential. Additionally, renovation can refer to making something new, or bringing something back to life and can apply in social contexts. For example, a community can be renovated if it is strengthened and revived.

Wood is versatile and flexible, making it the easiest construction material for Marlboro NJ renovations, and wood buildings can be redesigned to suit changing needs. Few homeowner or professional remodellers possess the skill and equipment that is required to alter steel-frame or concrete structures.

Forest certification verifies that Marlboro NJ wood products have been sourced from well-managed forests. Most certification programs provide online search options so that consumers can find certified products—the Certification Canada program includes a search option for all of the certification programs that are in use in Canada.

In North America, most structures are demolished because of external forces such as zoning changes and rising land values. Additionally, buildings that cannot be modified to serve the functional needs of the occupants are subject to demolition. Very few buildings in the continent are demolished due to structural degradation in Marlboro NJ.

The Athena Institute surveyed 227 commercial and residential buildings that were demolished in St. PaulMinnesota, United States (U.S.) between 2000 and mid-2003. Thirty percent of the buildings were less than fifty years old, and 6% were less than twenty-five years old. The four top reasons for demolition were “Area redevelopment” (35%), “Building’s physical condition” (31%), “Not suitable for anticipated use” (22%), and “Fire damage” (7%). Lack of maintenance was cited as the specific problem for fifty-four of the seventy buildings where physical condition was given as the reason for demolition.

bathroom is a room for personal hygiene, generally containing a bathtub or a shower, and possibly also a bidet. In North America and some other regions, it characteristically contains a toilet and a sink; hence in North American English the word "bathroom" is commonly used to mean any room containing a toilet, even a public toilet (although in the United States this is more commonly called a restroom). In other countries, including the UKAustraliaFrance and Japan, homes may have a separate toilet. In Iran almost all homes have two distinct rooms for bathroom and toilet room.

Powder room Marlboro NJ

A powder room also called "1/2 bath" or "guest bath" usually refers to a room with a toilet and a sink and commonly used by guests.

Shower room Marlboro NJ

shower room or shower-room is a room that contains a shower cubicle (or shower stall), but no bathtub. In the United States, this would be called a 3/4 bathroom.

Ensuite Marlboro NJ

An ensuite bathroom or ensuite shower room (also en suiteensuite and other variations) is a bathroom or shower room attached to and only accessible from a bedroom.

Family bathroom Marlboro NJ

family bathroom, in British estate agent terminology, is a full bathroom in a house.

Jack and Jill bathroom Marlboro NJ

Jack and Jill bathroom is a bathroom with two doors, accessible from two bedrooms.

Wetroom Marlboro NJ

wetroom is a waterproof room usually equipped with a shower. It is designed to eliminate moisture damage that is caused to a home and is also compatible with the heating systems beneath the floor.

In Marlboro NJ, bathrooms are generally categorized as master bathroom, containing a shower and a tub that is adjoining to a master bedroom, a "full bathroom" (or "full bath"), containing four plumbing fixtures: bathtub, shower, toilet, and sink; "half (1/2) bath" (or "powder room") containing just a toilet and sink; and "3/4 bath" containing toilet, sink, and shower, although the terms vary from market to market. In some U.S. markets, a toilet, sink, and shower are considered a "full bath". This lack of a single, universal definition commonly results in discrepancies between advertised and actual number of baths in real estate listings. An additional complication is that there are currently two ways of notating the number of bathrooms in a dwelling. One method is to count a half bathroom as ".5" and then add this to the number of full bathrooms (e.g., "2.5" baths would mean 2 full baths and 1 half bath). The other, newer method is to put the number of full bathrooms to the left side of the decimal point and to put the number of half bathrooms to the right of the decimal point (e.g., "2.1" would mean 2 full baths and 1 half bath; "3.2" would mean 3 full baths and 2 half baths).

Kitchen Renovations Marlboro NJ

kitchen is a room or part of a room used for cooking and food preparation. In the West, a modern residential kitchen is typically equipped with a stove, a sink with hot and cold running water, a refrigerator and kitchen cabinetsarranged according to a modular design. Many households have a microwave oven, a dishwasher and other electric appliances. The main function of a kitchen is cooking or preparing food but it may also be used for diningfood storageentertainingdishwashinglaundry.

The evolution of the kitchen is linked to the invention of the cooking range or stove and the development of water infrastructure capable of supplying water to private homes. Until the 18th century, food was cooked over an open fire. Technical advances in heating food in the 18th and 19th centuries, changed the architecture of the kitchen. Before the advent of modern pipes, water was brought from an outdoor source such as wells, pumps or springs.

The Frankfurt Kitchen of 1926 was made of several materials depending on the application. The built-in kitchens of today use particle boards or MDF, decorated with veneers, in some cases also wood. Very few manufacturers produce home built-in kitchens from stainless-steel. Until the 1950s, steel kitchens were used by architects, but this material was displaced by the cheaper particle board panels sometimes decorated with a steel surface.

Custom Kitchen Marlboro NJ

Domestic (or residential) kitchen design per se is a relatively recent discipline. The first ideas to optimize the work in the kitchen go back to Catharine Beecher's A Treatise on Domestic Economy (1843, revised and republished together with her sister Harriet Beecher Stowe as The American Woman's Home in 1869). Beecher's "model kitchen" propagated for the first time a systematic design based on early ergonomics. The design included regular shelves on the walls, ample work space, and dedicated storage areas for various food items. Beecher even separated the functions of preparing food and cooking it altogether by moving the stove into a compartment adjacent to the kitchen.

Christine Frederick published from 1913 a series of articles on "New Household Management" in which she analyzed the kitchen following Taylorist principles, presented detailed time-motion studies, and derived a kitchen design from them. Her ideas were taken up in the 1920s by architects in Germany and Austria, most notably Bruno Taut,Erna Meyer, and Margarete Schütte-Lihotzky. A social housing project in Frankfurt (the Römerstadt of architect Ernst May) realized in 1927/8 was the breakthrough for her Frankfurt kitchen, which embodied this new notion of efficiency in the kitchen.

While this "work kitchen" and variants derived from it were a great success for tenement buildings, home owners had different demands and did not want to be constrained by a 6.4 m² kitchen. Nevertheless, kitchen design was mostly ad-hoc following the whims of the architect. In the U.S., the "Small Homes Council", since 1993 the "Building Research Council", of the School of Architecture of the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign was founded in 1944 with the goal to improve the state of the art in home building, originally with an emphasis on standardization for cost reduction. It was there that the notion of the kitchen work triangle was formalized: the three main functions in a kitchen are storage, preparation, and cooking (which Catharine Beecher had already recognized), and the places for these functions should be arranged in the kitchen in such a way that work at one place does not interfere with work at another place, the distance between these places is not unnecessarily large, and no obstacles are in the way. A natural arrangement is a triangle, with the refrigerator, the sink, and the stove at a vertex each.

This observation led to a few common kitchen forms, commonly characterized by the arrangement of the kitchen cabinets and sink, stove, and refrigerator:

  • single-file kitchen (or one-way galley) has all of these along one wall; the work triangle degenerates to a line. This is not optimal, but often the only solution if space is restricted. This may be common in an attic space that is being converted into a living space, or a studio apartment.
  • The double-file kitchen (or two-way galley) has two rows of cabinets at opposite walls, one containing the stove and the sink, the other the refrigerator. This is the classical work kitchen.
  • In the L-kitchen, the cabinets occupy two adjacent walls. Again, the work triangle is preserved, and there may even be space for an additional table at a third wall, provided it does not intersect the triangle.
  • U-kitchen has cabinets along three walls, typically with the sink at the base of the "U". This is a typical work kitchen, too, unless the two other cabinet rows are short enough to place a table at the fourth wall.
  • G-kitchen has cabinets along three walls, like the U-kitchen, and also a partial fourth wall, often with a double basin sink at the corner of the G shape. The G-kitchen provides additional work and storage space, and can support two work triangles. A modified version of the G-kitchen is the double-L, which splits the G into two L-shaped components, essentially adding a smaller L-shaped island or peninsula to the L-kitchen.
  • The block kitchen (or island) is a more recent development, typically found in open kitchens. Here, the stove or both the stove and the sink are placed where an L or U kitchen would have a table, in a free-standing "island", separated from the other cabinets. In a closed room, this does not make much sense, but in an open kitchen, it makes the stove accessible from all sides such that two persons can cook together, and allows for contact with guests or the rest of the family, since the cook does not face the wall any more. Additionally, the kitchen island's counter-top can function as an overflow-surface for serving buffet style meals or sitting down to eat breakfast and snacks.

In the 1980s, there was a backlash against industrial kitchen planning and cabinets with people installing a mix of work surfaces and free standing furniture, led by kitchen designer Johnny Grey and his concept of the "Unfitted Kitchen".

Modern kitchens often have enough informal space to allow for people to eat in it without having to use the formal dining room. Such areas are called "breakfast areas", "breakfast nooks" or "breakfast bars" if the space is integrated into a kitchen counter. Kitchens with enough space to eat in are sometimes called "eat-in kitchens".

Tile Installation Marlboro NJ

tile is a manufactured piece of hard-wearing material such as ceramicstone, metal, or even glass, generally used in Marlboro NJ for covering roofs, floors, walls, showers, or other objects such as tabletops. Alternatively, tile can sometimes refer to similar units made from lightweight materials such as perlitewood, and mineral wool, typically used for wall and ceiling applications. In another sense, a tile is a construction tile or similar object, such as rectangular counters used in playing games (see tile-based game). The word is derived from the French word tuile, which is, in turn, from the Latin word tegula, meaning a roof tile composed of fired clay.

Tiles are often used to form wall and floor coverings, and can range from simple square tiles to complex mosaics. Tiles are most often made of ceramic, typically glazed for internal uses and unglazed for roofing, but other materials are also commonly used, such as glass, cork, concrete and other composite materials, and stone. Tiling stone is typically marble, onyx, granite or slate. Thinner tiles can be used on walls than on floors, which require more durable surfaces that will resist impacts.

Ceramics for tiles include earthenware (terracotta), stoneware or porcelain. Stoneware is harder and more durable than earthenware, and so more suitable for floors, but there is a slight difference between porcelain and ceramic tiles. Terracotta is traditionally used for roof tiles, but other manufactured materials including types of concrete may now be used.

These are commonly made of ceramic or stone, although recent technological advances have resulted in rubber or glass tiles for floors as well. Ceramic tiles may be painted and glazed. Small mosaic tiles may be laid in various patterns. Floor tiles are typically set into mortar consisting of sandcement and often a latex additive for extra adhesion. The spaces between the tiles are nowadays filled with sanded or unsanded floor grout, but traditionally mortar was used.

Natural stone tiles in Marlboro NJ can be beautiful but as a natural product they are less uniform in color and pattern, and require more planning for use and installation. Mass-produced stone tiles are uniform in width and length. Granite or marble tiles are sawn on both sides and then polished or finished on the facing up side, so that they have a uniform thickness. Other natural stone tiles such as slate are typically "riven" (split) on the facing up side so that the thickness of the tile varies slightly from one spot on the tile to another and from one tile to another. Variations in tile thickness can be handled by adjusting the amount of mortar under each part of the tile, by using wide grout lines that "ramp" between different thicknesses, or by using a cold chisel to knock off high spots.

Some stone tiles such as polished granite, marble, and travertine are very slippery when wet. Stone tiles with a riven (split) surface such as slate or with a sawn and then sandblasted or honed surface will be more slip resistant. Ceramic tiles for use in wet areas can be made more slip resistant either by using very small tiles so that the grout lines acts as grooves or by imprinting a contour pattern onto the face of the tile.

The hardness of natural stone tiles varies such that some of the softer stone (e.g. limestone) tiles are not suitable for very heavy traffic floor areas. On the other hand, ceramic tiles typically have a glazed upper surface and when that becomes scratched or pitted the floor looks worn, whereas the same amount of wear on natural stone tiles will not show, or will be less noticeable.

Natural stone tiles can be stained by spilled liquids; they must be sealed and periodically resealed with a sealant in contrast to ceramic tiles which only need their grout lines sealed. However, because of the complex, non repeating patterns in natural stone, small amounts of dirt on many natural stone floor tiles do not show.

The tendency of floor tiles to stain depends not only on a sealant being applied to your Marlboro NJ floor, and periodically re-applied, but also on their porosity or how porous the stone is. Slate is an example of a less porous stone while limestone is an example of a more porous stone. Different granites and marbles have different porosities with the less porous ones being more valued and more expensive.

Most vendors of stone tiles emphasize that there will be variation in color and pattern from one batch of tiles to another of the same description and variation within the same batch. Stone floor tiles tend to be heavier than ceramic tiles and somewhat more prone to breakage during shipment.

Rubber floor tiles have a variety of uses, both in residential and commercial settings. They are especially useful in situations where it is desired to have high-traction floors or protection for an easily breakable floor. Some common uses include flooring of garage, workshops, patios, swimming pool decks, sport courts, gyms, and dance floors.

Plastic floor tiles including interlocking floor tiles that can be installed without adhesive or glue are a recent innovation and are suitable for areas subject to heavy traffic, wet areas and floors that are subject to movement, damp or contamination from oil, grease or other substances that may prevent adhesion to the substrate. Common uses include old factory floors, garages, gyms and sports complexes, schools and shops.

Bathtub Installation Marlboro NJ

bathtubbath or tub (informal) is a large container for holding water in which a person may bathe in Marlboro NJ. Most modern bathtubs are made of acrylic or fiberglass, but alternatives are available in enamel on steel or cast iron; occasionally, waterproof finished wood. A bathtub is usually placed in a bathroom either as a stand-alone fixture or in conjunction with a shower.

Modern Marlboro NJ bathtubs have overflow and waste drains and may have taps mounted on them. They are usually built-in, but may be free-standing or sometimes sunken. Until recently, most bathtubs were roughly rectangular in shape but with the advent of acrylic thermoformed baths, more shapes are becoming available. Bathtubs are commonly white in colour although many other colours can be found. The process for enamelling cast iron bathtubs was invented by the Scottish-born American David Dunbar Buick.

Two main styles of bathtub are common in Marlboro NJ:

  • Western style bathtubs in which the bather lies down. These baths are typically shallow and long.
  • Eastern style bathtubs in which the bather sits up. These are known as ofuro in Japan and are typically short and deep.

Documented early plumbing systems for bathing go back as far as around 3300 BC with the discovery of copper water pipes beneath a palace in the Indus Valley Civilization of ancient India; see sanitation of the Indus Valley Civilization. Evidence of the earliest surviving personal sized bath tub was found on the Isle of Crete where a 5-foot (1.5 m) long pedestal tub was found built from hardened pottery.

The clawfoot tub, which reached the apex of its popularity in the late 19th century; had its origins in the mid 18th century, where the ball and claw design originated in Holland, possibly artistically inspired by the Chinese motif of a dragon holding a precious stone. The design spread to England where it found much popularity among the aristocracy, just as bathing was becoming increasingly fashionable. Early bathtubs in England tended to be made of cast iron, or even tin and copper with a face of paint applied that tended to peel with time.

The Scottish-born entrepreneur David Buick invented a process for bonding porcelain enamel to cast iron in the 1880s while working for the Alexander Manufacturing Company in Detroit. The company, as well as others including Kohler Company and J. L. Mott Iron Works, began successfully marketing porcelain enameled cast-iron bathtubs, a process that remains broadly the same to this day. Far from the ornate feet and luxury most associated with clawfoot tubs, an early Kohler example was advertised as a "horse trough/hog scalder, when furnished with four legs will serve as a bathtub." The item's use as hog scalder was considered a more important marketing point than its ability to function as a bathtub.

In the latter half of the 20th century, the once popular clawfoot tub morphed into a built-in tub with a small apron front. This enclosed style afforded easier maintenance and, with the emergence of colored sanitary ware, more design options for the homeowner. The Crane Company introduced colored bathroom fixtures to the US market in 1928, and slowly this influx of design options and easier cleaning and care led to the near demise of clawfoot-style tubs in Marlboro NJ.

Shower Installation Marlboro NJ

Though the installation requirements of each Marlboro NJ shower will differ, in general the installation of a shower requires the laying of several water transportation pipes, including a pipe for hot water and for cold water, and a drainage pipe.

It is important that the wet areas of a Marlboro NJ bathroom be waterproof, and multiple layers of waterproofing can be employed. Grout is used to fill gaps between tiles, but grout and tile setting materials are generally porous. Tiles are generally waterproof. Thus small mosaic tiles offer less of a defense than large format tiles. Sub-tile waterproofing is important when tiles are being used. Best practice requires a waterproofing material to cover the walls and floor of the shower area that are then covered with tile, or in some countries with a sheet material like vinyl.

Some shower areas in Marlboro NJ utilize a second emergency drain outside of the shower in case of overflow. In Australia and some European countries plumbing codes require this second emergency drain (but not in the United Kingdom nor North America).

Designs for shower facilities vary by location and purpose. There are free-standing showers, but also showers which are integrated into a bathtub. Showers are separated from the surrounding area through watertight curtains (shower curtain),sliding doors, or folding doors, in order to protect the space from spraying water. Showers with a level entry wet room are becoming very popular, especially due to improvements in waterproofing systems and prefabricated components.

Places such as a swimming pool, a locker room, or a military facility have multiple showers. There may be communal shower rooms without divisions, or shower stalls (typically open at the top.)

Many types of showers are available in Marlboro NJ, including complete shower units which are all encompassing showers that include the pan, walls, and often the shower head, as well as pieced together units in which the pan, shower head, and doors are purchased separately. Each type of shower poses different installation issues.

shower is a place in which a person bathes under a spray of, typically warm or hot, water. Most showers have temperature, spray pressure and adjustable showerhead nozzle settings.

The simplest showers have a swivelling nozzle aiming down on the user. More complex showers have a showerhead connected to a hose which has a mounting bracket. This allows the user to spray the water at different parts of their body. A shower can be installed in a small shower stall or in a bathtub.

Showering is common in western culture due to efficiency of using it when compared to a bath. Its use in hygiene is therefore common practice. A shower uses less water on average than a bath: 80 litres for a shower compared to 150 litres for a bath in Marlboro NJ.

Haas Door Sales Installation Marlboro NJ

New Marlboro NJ garage doors can be a fashion statement. People are becoming more style conscious when replacing their garage door. On many American homes, the garage door claims a third of the façade, so it’s a snap to quickly makeover the look of your whole house. For the best residential garage doors in Northwest Ohio & Southeast Michigan, trust Haas Garage Door Company. A new Marlboro NJ garage door can bring new life to your home and add great curb appeal. Whether you need a new automatic garage door or a new entry door, we have it all!  At Haas, we also supply custom-build carriage house garage doors, beautifully made in our on-site shop.

Haas Garage Door Company offers many options when it comes to choosing the right door for you. As an authorized dealer, these options include a wide array of color choices, whether you prefer the most popular white, to sandstone, almond, gray, black, a wood tone, and countless others. We offer automatic garage doors that will suit any residential style or design, including flat panels, raised ranch or colonial panels, and carriage style panels. Window options are also key in designing your new garage door. You can also choose the level of energy efficiency which suits your needs as well.

Clopay Sales Installation Marlboro NJ

Residential Marlboro NJ garage doors from Clopay® offer you a world of choices in both function and fashion. You can choose a style that will enhance the beauty of your home and instantly upgrade your home’s curb appeal. Clopay® has authentic carriage house style garage doors, real and faux wood styles and a wide selection of steel and composite garage doors with both raised and flush panel and contemporary glass and aluminum options. You can add natural light with your choice of windows, ranging from plain and decorative glass to beautifully designed inserts. And our doors are designed with your convenience in mind: most of Clopay’s decorative window inserts can be removed for easy cleaning. 

You‘ll find wonderful personalization options for your Clopay® garage door. You can choose from an extensive selection of door designs that include features like deep embossed panels, coped edges, designer hardware and a wide variety of colors, stains and finishes. It’s fun to put together just the door you want to transform the look of your home. And Clopay® is the only manufacturer that offers entry doors to complement your garage door, so you can improve your curb appeal all along the front of your home. 

In addition to being beautiful, Clopay® garage doors are extremely durable.

Proudly manufactured in the USA and backed by the Good Housekeeping Seal of Approval, our steel doors are engineered and constructed to last for years with minimal maintenance. They feature sturdy tracks, rollers and hinges, tough layered coatings to prevent rust and patented Safe-T-Brackets. With long-lasting hardware and strong, durable springs, you can expect years of enjoyment from your new garage door. And Clopay® has the largest network of professional dealers and The Home Depot to install and service your doors. They are happy to help you make your choice and explain the features and design elements of all our garage doors. 

Clopay® doors are also energy efficient, a real benefit when you think that your garage door is the largest opening in your home. Offering two types of door insulation, Intellicore® polyurethane and polystyrene as well as a range of insulated glass, Clopay® garage doors can help lower your heating and cooling costs, and improve the comfort of your home. Your local Clopay® dealer can help you choose the type of door that’s best for your climate and your insulation needs.

Wayne Dalton Sales Installation Marlboro NJ

About seventy miles south of Cleveland lies Holmes County and Mt. Hope, Ohio, a picturesque farming community steeped in Amish tradition. There's a hardware store, a post office, an auction barn, a handful of neatly kept homes, thousands of acres of rolling farmland, and where Wayne Dalton garage doors originated.

Largely due to its Amish heritage, Holmes County is home to many proud craftspeople who make cabinets, desks, chairs, quilts and a myriad of hand-crafted items. The area is well known for its many quaint restaurants, gift shops and cheese houses.

Holmes County is also home to Wayne Dalton's largest manufacturing plant, which sits just across the street from its original site. Consisting of 50,000 square feet of tinted glass and steel, the facility won statewide architectural recognition for its design and how well it was integrated into the rural countryside. The company's 900,000-square-foot manufacturing facility is also located here. From its windows, views of the Amish farmers working three-horse teams serve as a constant reminder of the practical values, craftsmanship and work ethic which has contributed so much to our own success.

Since its inception in 1954, Wayne Dalton has become known as a company with innovative ideas which far exceed industry standards in Marlboro NJ. Often, Wayne Dalton is the only source for the latest garage doors. Because the company has always maintained a staunch commitment to developing innovative new products, Wayne Dalton is now a leader in the garage door industry.

LiftMaster Sales Installation Marlboro NJ

LiftMaster is the number one brand of professionally installed residential Garage Door Openers, as well as a major manufacturer of Commercial Door Operators, Residential and Commercial Gate Operators, Telephone Entry Systems and related Access Control products in Marlboro NJ. Our expansive line of state-of-the-art residential and commercial products are designed to fit any lifestyle or application, providing the latest technology and innovations in safety and security, performance and connectivity.

Our mission is to exceed the expectations of our customers by providing exceptional products and services that are safe and reliable. We put quality and safety at the forefront of everything we do and are committed to delivering quality products, innovative designs and comprehensive services which exceed our customers’ expectations, and provide peace of mind knowing their home or business is secure.

Haas Door, Clopay, Wayne Dalton, LiftMaster Haas Door Clopay Wayne Dalton LiftMaster

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